Can you have too many programming language features?

There’s more than one way to do it. Perl motto There should be one– and preferably only one –obvious way to do it. The Zen of Python (inconsistent formatting is part of the quote) When it comes to statically-typed systems programming languages, C++ is the Perl, and Rust is the Python. In this post, the next installment of my Rust vs C++ series, I will attempt to explain why C++’s feature-set is problematic, and explain how Rust does better.

Choosing the Right Integers

Paying attention to beginner questions is important. While many are just re-hashes of things that books have explained 1000 times, some are quite interesting, like this one that I saw recently in a Reddit post: How do I determine when to use i8-64 (same for u8-64)? Now, here is a surprisingly hard question. It’s really easy to find out what i16 and u8 and friends mean, and what they do: the appropriate section comes really early in The Book.

A Rust Gem: The Rust Map API

For my next entry in my series comparing Rust to C++, I will be discussing a specific data structure API: the Rust map API. Maps are often one of the more awkward parts of a collections library, and the Rust map API is top-notch, especially its entry API – I literally squealed when I first learned about entries. And as we shall discuss, this isn’t just because Rust made better choices than other standard libraries when designing the maps API.

Being Fair about Memory Safety and Performance

For this next iteration in my series comparing Rust to C++, I want to talk about something I’ve been avoiding so far: memory safety. I’ve been avoiding this topic so far because I think it is the most discussed difference between C++ and Rust, and therefore I felt I’d have relatively little to add to the conversation. I’ve also been avoiding it because I wanted to draw attention to all the other little ways in which Rust is a better-designed programming language, to say that even if you concede to the C++ people that Rust isn’t “truly memory safe” or “memory safe enough,” Rust still wins.

C++ Move Semantics Considered Harmful (Rust is better)

This post is part of my series comparing C++ to Rust, which I introduced with a discussion of C++ and Rust syntax. In this post, I discuss move semantics. This post is framed around the way moves are implemented in C++, and the fundamental problem with that implementation, With that context, I shall then explain how Rust implements the same feature. I know that move semantics in Rust are often confusing to new Rustaceans – though not as confusing as move semantics in C++ – and I think an exploration of how move semantics work in C++ can be helpful in understanding why Rust is designed the way it is, and why Rust is a better alternative to C++.

Sayonara, C++, and hello to Rust!

This past May, I started a new job working in Rust. I was somewhat skeptical of Rust for a while, but it turns out, it really is all it’s cracked up to be. As a long-time C++ programmer, and C++ instructor, I am convinced that Rust is better than C++ in all of C++’s application space, that for any new programming project where C++ would make sense as the programming language, Rust would make more sense.

Function Pointers in C and C++

Programmers of functional programming languages will often point out that, in functional programming languages, the order of the arguments is often significant, because of currying. If you have a function that takes two arguments (e.g. map which takes a function to apply and a list to apply it to) it actually takes the first argument, and returns a function that takes the second argument and returns the final result. This makes it more convenient to write a lambda where the second argument is the unknown parameter: \x -> map someFunc x can be written as map f, whereas \f -> map f someValue has no such convenient shorthand (flip map someValue is actually clunkier).